15 Jul 2015

Annual workplace injuries 2014/15

Figures published today show that while Britain continues to be one of the safest places to work in Europe, too many workers are still being killed.



The Fatal injury statistics released by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) show that there were 142 workers and 102 members of the public lost their lives in 2014/15 due to accidents connected to work.

A staggering estimated 1.9 million working days were lost due to trips, slips and manual handling injuries in 2014/15. The cost to society from such injuries is an estimated £138 million (based on average pay 2015) 
Judith Hackitt, the chair of HSE, says that behind every number is the reality of a real person being killed or suffering injuries whilst simply doing their job. 

The statistics show that in 2014/15 there were 142 fatal injuries, a rise from 133 the previous year. Although the news of a rise is worrying, the statistics also show that the UK has sustained a long-term trend that has seen the rate of fatalities more than halve over the last 20 years.

The statistics confirm the UK to be one of the safest places to work in Europe, having one of the lowest rates of fatal injuries to workers in leading industrial nations, however of the 142 fatally injured 51% worked in key industrial sectors making construction, agriculture or waste & recycling the deadliest working environment in the UK.

Judith Hackitt said: “These latest figures remind us what health and safety is really about. We should remind ourselves what these numbers actually mean – the number of times in the last year someone went out to work and either did not return home to their loved ones or came home with life changing injuries.
 The main accidents occurring in the UK are falls from heights, contact with moving machinery or being stuck by a moving vehicle with new workers being 4 times more likely to be injured as those employed for a year.




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