30 Apr 2014

Safe Equipment Management System

Most workplace equipments have built-in safety features. These features have been designed and perfected in order to protect users as much as possible. These safety features are not fail safe, and should be checked regularly to ensure equipment is in good working order.

According to figures on the HSE website, workplace injuries resulted in a loss of £13.8 billion and 27 million working days.

Accidents can be avoided by ensuring operators have adequate training, personal protective equipment, ensuring the correct tools are used and by using the Good to Go Safety Safe Equipment Management System.

Good to Go Safety offer a checklist and tagging system for workplace equipment. It allows a pre-use inspection to be carried out and findings clearly displayed inside the status tag for all employees to see.

Flexible to suit your needs, the Good to Go SEMS enables you to take control of your workplace by carrying out regular equipment checks in line with PUWER and your quality, maintenance and H&S policies. Whether you require daily, weekly, monthly or ad-hoc checks to be carried out, Good to Go Safety provides the perfect solution.

Reinforcing your businesses dedication to safety with the SEMS will not solve other elements of danger such as human distraction, lack of interest, tiredness or rushing, however it has been designed to reduce the chance of accidents within your workplace plus a carbon copy of each completed checklist provides a permanent record of all findings.
Click Here for more information.
29 Apr 2014

Roofers fined after being spotted working unsafely



Date: 28 April 2014

A West Midlands roofing firm has been fined after a passing safety official spotted an employee working unsafely at height without any fall protection.

Water Orton-based GS Roofing Specialists LLP was prosecuted today (28 April) today following the chance encounter at the Kelvin Way Trading Estate in West Bromwich on 26 September 2013.

Sandwell Magistrates’ Court heard that an inspector for the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) was on the industrial estate when he spotted two workers on a fragile roof of a nearby business unit. He noted they working on the roof without any adequate fall prevention or fall mitigation measures in place.

A subsequent HSE investigation found that GS Roofing Specialists LLP had prepared a risk assessment and method statement for this work that stated that guard rails and netting would be used. They weren’t, and suitable boarding, platforms, or coverings were also overlooked.

GS Roofing Specialists LLP, of Attleboro Lane, Water Orton, was fined £7,500 and ordered to pay £1,090 costs after pleading guilty to breaching regulation 9(2) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005.

After the hearing, HSE inspector Gareth Langston said:

“The dangers that the workers faced were so great and immediately obvious when I witnessed the safety breaches being committed.

“GS Roofing Specialists LLP blatantly ignored the risk assessment’s advice for fall protection to be in place, leaving workers exposed to an unnecessary risk of a serious or even fatal injury.

“Working at height is a high-risk activity. There is a need to adequately plan for such work and ensure those plans are fully implemented and monitored effectively to ensure the safety of those involved.”

Last year more than 6,300 employees suffered major injuries after falling from height at work. Working on roofs account for almost a quarter of all workers who are killed in falls from heights, and falls through fragile materials like sky lights account for more of these deaths than any other single cause. Many others are seriously injured and are left with life-changing disabilities.

Information on preventing falls ay work Click Here


Notes to Editors:

1. The Health and Safety Executive is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice; promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice; and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement.www.hse.gov.uk

2. Regulation 9(2) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005 states: “Where it is not reasonably practicable to carry out work safely and under appropriate ergonomic conditions without passing across or near, or working on, from or near, a fragile surface, every employer shall (a) ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, that suitable and sufficient platforms, coverings, guard rails or similar means of support or protection are provided and used so that any foreseeable loading is supported by such supports or borne by such protection; (b) where a risk of a person at work falling remains despite the measures taken under the preceding provisions of this regulation, take suitable and sufficient measures to minimise the distances and consequences of his fall.”

HSE news releases are available at www.hse.gov.uk/press - HSE Bulletin (Reproduced under the terms of the Click-Use Licence)

For more information regarding the Good to Go Safety System Click Here - Helping you meet your obligations under PUWER and H&S legislation and reduce accidents in the workplace.
22 Apr 2014

The Universal Status Tag

Our patented safety system can be used on a wide range of applications, such as:

Forklifts       Scaffolding     Ladders
Racking       Vehicles          Pallet Trucks
Harness       MEWP             Plus many more

The Good to Go Safety Status tag is manufactured from polypropylene. A tough, durable, weather resistant material which has been coloured yellow in order to make it highly visible to users.

The channelled base allows the tag to sit flush to rounded surfaces such as scaffolding tubes and the pre-drilled holes enable you to fit the status tag to all types of equipment, quickly and effectively using a choice of screws, cable ties, adhesive, rivets etc.

A universal tag enables your employees to become accustomed to the system - having just one universal tag for all types of equipment eliminates the hassle of stocking multiple tags and the potential for employee confusion.

Click here to read more about the Good to Go Safety System.

15 Apr 2014

Company fined after worker’s foot injury



Date: 11 April 2014

A nationwide removals and storage company has been sentenced for safety failings after a forklift truck reversed into a worker at an Essex site, causing serious injuries.

The 58-year-old man from Braintree was struck by the truck as he stood by the cab of a removals lorry during a loading operation at Pickfords’ Appletree Farm site on Polecat Road, Cressing, on 9 April 2013.

The worker, who does not wish to be named, suffered three broken toes when the front of his left foot was forced into the steel toecap of his boot during the impact. He also suffered a dislocation of the upper foot as well as bruising.

He has since had to wear a special support in his shoe to help him walk correctly and was only able to return to work some 11 months after the incident.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) prosecuted Pickfords Ltd at Colchester Magistrates’ Court after an investigation found that the company didn’t have sufficient procedures in place to keep pedestrians away from operating forklift trucks.

The court was told that the forklift truck also had had a broken reversing alarm when the incident happened, which had not been working for over a year.

Pickfords Move Management Ltd of Pickfords Park, Laxcon Close, Drury Way Industrial Estate, London, was fined a total of £5,000 and ordered to pay costs of £1,415 after pleading guilty to breaching Regulation 17(1) of the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992.

After the case, HSE Inspector Keith Waller said:

“This was an entirely preventable injury caused by Pickfords’ failure to recognise the hazards arising from loading operations at their premises.

“The risks to pedestrians when they’re near to operating forklift trucks are very serious, but also well documented. There is no excuse, therefore, for companies to neglect safety.

“Pedestrians, whether they are employees or not, must always be kept separate from operating forklift trucks through a safe system of work that is clear and well adhered to.”

For more information about working safely around workplace vehicles Click Here


Notes to Editors:

1. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk

2. Regulation 17(1) of the Workplace [Health, Safety and Welfare] Regulations, 1992 states: “Every workplace shall be organised in such a way that pedestrians and vehicles can circulate in a safe manner.”

3. HSE news releases are available at www.hse.gov.uk/press

Regional reporters should call the appropriate Regional News Network press office. Issued on behalf of the Health and Safety Executive by the Regional News Network

HSE news releases are available at www.hse.gov.uk/press - HSE Bulletin (Reproduced under the terms of the Click-Use Licence)



Good to Go Safety

By using a Good to Go Safety Forklift Safety Checklist, the pre-use inspection would clearly flag up any issues or faults relating to the forklift. Indeed one of the checks listed is that horn/beeper and that it is clearly audible. When this fault is identified the checklist should be inserted into the tag to display the “Do Not Use” message, effectively quarantining the vehicle until the fault is resolved.

The need for routine daily inspections of forklift trucks is highlighted in this particular case, and the benefits of using a simple equipment management system like Good to Go Safety are clear for all to see. To find out more about our Forklift Inspection systems – available as individual check books, weekly kits or daily kits, please Click Here

10 Apr 2014

Good to Go Safety Weekly Kits



Accidents in the workplace can be a frequent occurrence, often as a result of inadequate training or equipment misuse.

Businesses which use hazardous equipment on occasion should still ensure it has been safety checked. Checking them weekly or prior to every use will dramatically reduce the chance of any accident. Safety should be the main priority in every working environment and Good to Go Safety offer a flexible solution to ensure all equipment is safe and in good working order. With a Weekly Good to Go Safety Kit you’ll have everything you need for a full years worth of weekly inspections.

The Good to Go Safety kit includes a Status Tag, which will display the status of your workplace equipment. One hundred Tamper Evident Seals, which should be used to ensure that all findings are correct and cannot be tampered with. Two Safety Check Books enabling you to inspect the condition of the equipment and display whether it is in working order or if should not be used. Check Book Wallet and Pen, which will keep the carbon copy neat and free from any creases. Using the Good to Go Weekly Kit will provide your employees with a safer working environment. Enabling them to check workplace equipment before operation and quarantine faulty equipment.
9 Apr 2014

Are you a construction worker?



The law requires construction workers to:

Take care of your own health and safety and that of others who may affected by what you do, or fail to do; Co-operate with your employer, fellow workers, contractors and others to enable them to make and keep the workplace safe; and Never interfere with, or misuse anything provided for health and safety purposes.

What you need to know

Employers and contractors who control construction work are required to assess the risks and provide workers with:

Induction:
a suitable site induction on health and safety matters;
Information and training: for the particular work carried, out including the risks and precautions required; and Site rules; and Emergency procedures.


Take care

As a worker in the construction industry, you can look after your own health and safety by:

Being competent –
only do construction work that you are competent to do safely; and
Removing hazards – do not walk past by obvious hazards that can be dealt with easily.
Remove the hazard or tell someone who can.


Co-operate

Good standards of safety are achieved when everyone on site works together. The three most positive actions you can take are to:

Follow site rules –
site health and safety rules are important. You can help by following site health and safety rules and any directions given by those who manage the work.
Report and discuss problems – report and discuss any health and safety problems arising from your work so that significant risks can be controlled;

Consultation – On ‘notifiable’ projects you will be able to take part in arrangements to consult the workforce on health, safety or welfare matters.

HSE Bulletin (Reproduced under the terms of the Click-Use Licence)
7 Apr 2014

Good to Go - Carbon Copies



Accidents in the workplace can be a frequent occurrence, often as a result of inadequate training or equipment misuse.

Good to Go Safety Check Books will enable your employees to run through a list of questions to minimise risks within the workplace. A carbon copy is retained upon the completion of the checklist and depending on the result of these questions the top sheet will display the status of your equipment within the Good to Go Safety Status Tag. This will visually communicate to all employees whether it is in good working order or if it has been quarantined. Using the Good to Go SEMS will give your employees more confidence whilst working with hazardous equipment.

Having a record of previous equipment checks in the form of carbon copies can protect your business from potential legal action. It enables auditors to establish whether faults have been detected and whether an accident has occurred due to equipment negligence or personal failings to adhere to Health & Safety.

The Good to Go Safety system attempts to identify potential faults before they develop into a costly incident. We don’t believe in waiting for an accident to occur before taking action. Good to Go Safety Simply remove potential risks at the source by promoting pre-use checks.

Within the UK an average of three fatalities occur every month due to falling from a height!



House builder fined after construction worker seriously injured in fall.

Date: 4 April 2014

A Tyneside house builder has been fined after a worker was seriously injured in a fall when a temporary handrail gave way as she leant on it.

The 23-year-old, from Gateshead, who does not want to be named, was working for Bellway Homes Ltd at a site in Earsdon View, Shiremoor, when the incident happened on 4 December 2012.

The agency worker broke her right wrist, fractured her forehead, jaw and cheekbone, and sustained a hairline fracture to her right hip. She also severed tendons in her left hand and suffered extensive bruising to her face, neck and back.

She had to have a metal plate inserted into her right arm and required further surgery to ease later complications.

She was unable to return to work as a labourer for six months and still suffers constant pain. It is unlikely she will ever return to her usual trade working as a plasterer.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) today (4 April) prosecuted Bellway Homes Ltd for safety failings after investigating the incident.

North Tyneside Magistrates’ Court heard how the worker had been clearing rubbish on the first floor of a property nearing completion and was on the landing talking to another worker in the ground floor hallway. As she leant on a temporary handrail on the landing it gave way, causing her to fall around 2.6 metres to the floor below.

The HSE investigation found that the temporary handrail was a single piece of timber fixed to the protective cover of an upright post at one side and nailed with one nail into a timber door frame at the other side, which was where it gave way. There was no mid-rail to provide additional support.

The court was told that the company had failed to provide suitable and sufficient measures to prevent the fall, and that had a more robust handrail been in place the incident could have been avoided.

Bellway Homes Limited, of Seaton Burn House, Dudley Lane, Seaton Burn, Newcastle, was fined £10,000 after pleading guilty to breaching Regulation 6(3) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005. The company was also ordered to pay £904.70 costs.

Speaking after the case, HSE Inspector Emma Scott said:

“This incident could easily have been prevented if Bellway Homes Limited had ensured that temporary guard rails were erected and installed correctly.

“Instead a young worker has been left with serious injuries which are still causing her pain and may well prevent her from continuing work in her chosen trade.

“The significant dangers of death and serious injury associated with falls from height during construction work are well known and long standing in the industry, and working on a landing area without suitable safety measures in place is simply not acceptable.”

For more information about working at height safely Click Here

Notes to Editors:

1. Health and Safety Executive is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice; promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice; and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement. www.hse.gov.uk

2. Regulation 6(3) of the Work at Height Regulations 2005 states: “Where work is carried out at height, every employer shall take suitable and sufficient measures to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, any person falling from a distance liable to cause personal injury.”

3. HSE news releases are available at www.hse.gov.uk/press.

HSE Bulletin (Reproduced under the terms of the Click-Use Licence)
4 Apr 2014

Don't take the Chance - Are you Good to Go?



Company in court after apprentice loses finger

Date: 3 April 2014

A Northumberland company has been fined after a worker’s left hand was crushed in machinery leading to the amputation of one of his fingers.

The Bedlington man, who was 18 at the time, was a third year apprentice with Miller UK Ltd when the incident occurred at its Cramlington premises on 12 March 2013.

Bedlington Magistrates’ Court heard today (3 April) that he was working on a large guillotine cutting a piece of metal, which was held in place between the blade and cutting table by mechanical clamps.

As the apprentice loaded a piece of metal into the machine, his left hand came into contact with the clamps in front of the blade trapping it. He suffered crush injuries to his hand leading to the amputation of his index finger below the second joint. His second finger was also broken.

He was in hospital for three days and remained off work for six months. He suffered post-traumatic stress syndrome and continues to suffer discomfort and fatigue in his hand. An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found the safety guard fitted on the machine was ineffective in its design and had been poorly maintained so was not working correctly.

Miller UK Ltd had also failed to carry out a sufficient assessment of the risks associated with the work and the fault had not been reported.

Miller UK Ltd, of Bassington Industrial Estate, Bassington Lane, Cramlington, was fined £8,000 and ordered to pay £894.95 costs after pleading guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974.

After the case, HSE Inspector Laura Catterall said:

“This young man is now living with a permanent impairment but his injuries could have easily been avoided had Miller UK Ltd adequately assessed the risks, which would have spotted that the guard was not effective.

“This failing was compounded by poor maintenance and a breakdown in the fault reporting system – which together led to one of its workers suffering severe injuries.

“Guards and safety systems are there for a reason and companies have a legal duty of care to ensure they are properly fitted and working effectively at all times.”

For more information and guidance on work equipment Click Here

Notes to Editors:

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety. It aims to reduce work-related death, injury and ill health. It does so through research, information and advice, promoting training; new or revised regulations and codes of practice, and working with local authority partners by inspection, investigation and enforcement.

Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 states: “It shall be the duty of every employer to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work of all his employees.”

HSE news releases are available at www.hse.gov.uk/press - HSE Bulletin (Reproduced under the terms of the Click-Use Licence)
3 Apr 2014

Every year approximately 2,000 accidents and 10 fatalities are a result of forklift operation in the United Kingdom. That's 38 accidents a week!


It is estimated that each year 10% of all investigated accidents involving forklift trucks are caused largely by the lack of operator training. Ensure your operators carry out a daily check of their forklift with Good to Go Safety™ and significantly reduce the risk of accidents and unnecessary maintenance costs.

Good to Go Safety™ offers a simple solution for forklift safety with daily checks or weekly forklift inspections of the FLT to suit your needs. A forklift checklist provides a pre-use check as part of your FLT safety maintenance programme, equipment tagging ensures everyone is aware of the forklift status.


Workplace safety has never been easier. Ensures compliance with PUWER, LOLER, HSE & FLTA regulations and best practice. Instantly visible at the point of use - we recommend positioning the status pod at either the entry point to the cab, or by the ignition box to help provide an immediate reminder to the operator before he starts up the vehicle. A robust, UV stable and water resistant status pod enables both internal & external usage. Quick, easy to use check list ensures that key safety checks are carried out prior to use. The operator can simply complete the check list, sign and date it. Once inserted into the pod it provides a clear statement of the forklift status.


Clearly identifying when a forklift is 'good to go' and when it is not safe to use. A tamper evident seal ensures validity of the check list, preventing potential tampering with check lists. A duplicate copy of the completed check list is also maintained in the check book for reference. Chronological records of all inspections are stored in completed check books using carbon copy paper. These books can be kept in secure offices or even off-site as part of your maintenance records and can prove an invaluable source of reference in the event of any accidents. The annual kit provides a handy storage box for all completed check books. Employers have a duty of care to ensure all employees operating or working in the vicinity of forklifts are adequately informed of the potential hazards and the relevant safe work procedure in operation. Such systems will include controls on use, defect reporting & recording, and inspection & maintenance of forklift trucks and associated equipment. Good to Go Safety™ ticks all the boxes!
1 Apr 2014

Where should Good to Go Safety™ be used?


We offer a simple, effective and affordable solution to equipment safety.

The status pod should be displayed at entry point to equipment, to provide maximum visibility prior to its use. Whether you have a small business or a multi-national organisation, this system is essential to ensure you meet your obligations to providing a safe workplace.

The Good to Go Safety™ SEMS allows you to take control of your workplace and carry out equipment checks in line with your quality, maintenance and H&S policies. Many companies need daily checks to be carried out on various types of equipment (either as legislative requirements or best practice), whilst others may find weekly or even monthly checks to be sufficient. Our innovative range of checklists and tagging systems for workplace equipment allows competent inspectors to carry out regular checks and clearly display the findings to all employees.

Good to Go Safety™ is flexible to suit your needs, whilst providing a duplicate copy of each completed checklist for your management records. Many companies may ask the question, "Why do I need a SEMS if we haven’t had an accident?" Good to Go Safety™ attempts to identify potential faults before they develop into a costly incident. We don’t believe in waiting for an accident to occur before taking action, we simply remove potential risks at the source by promoting pre-use checks.

Good to Go Safety™ offers a simple, effective and affordable solution to equipment safety. The tag is universal, fitting to all types of equipment - simply choose the relevant check book and you are good to go. It is also unique in its ability to validate the status display. A patented tamper evident seal can be fitted to the tag once a check has been carried out. This prevents the findings from being removed or altered without an operative's knowledge. All equipment checks are also stored in a duplicate book, providing a clear chronological audit trail which can be examined in the event of any future accidents (providing invaluable documented evidence in the process).
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